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“Some people may find it hard to believe, but the Wren is one of Britain’s commonest birds. You don’t see big flocks of them, and indeed they are quite hard to spot at all since they are very small and skulky. However, Wrens are capable of living just about anywhere from an urban back yard, to wild sea cliffs of a desolate mountain top.

It is likely that way back in time they were most at home amongst ravines and tumbling streams. This may well explain why they have such incredibly loud songs, so that they can be heard above the sound of rushing water. Nowadays they compete with traffic or factory noises, though I often wonder if people even notice their song amongst the city soundscape. But female Wrens certainly hear the males, and each year they pair up and build lovely ball shaped nests that are tucked away in all sorts of places, both natural and “unnatural”. It is certainly worth putting out boxes for Wrens to nest and roost in, and they will readily come to food, especially if it is scattered on the ground or on a table.” – Bill Oddie

Wrens will take small mealworms offered on the bird table and will also be attracted by Bill’s Mealworm Crumble and Mealworm Muesli.

The wren is one of Europe's smallest birds and spends most of its time near the ground in bushes and thickets. They forage in dark, damp places (mainly under hedges) and feed on seeds, insects and spiders. Although they are small they have a loud vibrant distinctive song. Being brown in colour they are approximately 9-10cm long, have a wingspan of 13-17cm and weigh between 8-13gms only.

Their nests are made from balls of leaves and grass and they produce 5 or 6 eggs in 2 broods between April and July.

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mealworm crumble™ - robins rumble for Bill's mealworm crumble
mealworm crumble™ - robins rumble for Bill's mealworm crumble
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“Some people may find it hard to believe, but the Wren is one of Britain’s commonest birds. You don’t see big flocks of them, and indeed they are quite hard to spot at all since they are very small and skulky. However, Wrens are capable of living just about anywhere from an urban back yard, to wild sea cliffs of a desolate mountain top.

It is likely that way back in time they were most at home amongst ravines and tumbling streams. This may well explain why they have such incredibly loud songs, so that they can be heard above the sound of rushing water. Nowadays they compete with traffic or factory noises, though I often wonder if people even notice their song amongst the city soundscape. But female Wrens certainly hear the males, and each year they pair up and build lovely ball shaped nests that are tucked away in all sorts of places, both natural and “unnatural”. It is certainly worth putting out boxes for Wrens to nest and roost in, and they will readily come to food, especially if it is scattered on the ground or on a table.” – Bill Oddie

Wrens will take small mealworms offered on the bird table and will also be attracted by Bill’s Mealworm Crumble and Mealworm Muesli.

The wren is one of Europe's smallest birds and spends most of its time near the ground in bushes and thickets. They forage in dark, damp places (mainly under hedges) and feed on seeds, insects and spiders. Although they are small they have a loud vibrant distinctive song. Being brown in colour they are approximately 9-10cm long, have a wingspan of 13-17cm and weigh between 8-13gms only.

Their nests are made from balls of leaves and grass and they produce 5 or 6 eggs in 2 broods between April and July.

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